Do we really have to tell all of these people who never come to any homeowner meetings that we are having elections?  YES. You need to keep them fair if you want them to be valid.  In less than a minute you can know all you need to know in this Vlog.

Want to learn more about Wisconsin condominium and HOA law from experienced condo and HOA attorneys? Read all about condo and HOA law at Association Alert and click here to learn more about lawyer Daniel J. Miske.

As Condominium and HOA attorneys, we often receive questions from our clients dealing with all the issues that can get in the way of conducting a successful annual meeting. Most often, it is the issue of not being able to achieve a quorum of owners in attendance—which stymies the Association’s ability to hold Board member elections, approve the budget, and take other important actions to further the HOA’s business for the coming year.  So what happens if an Association’s Bylaws calls for annual board elections, but the Association does not hold elections for a number of years?  Is there a Board? Does the Board have any authority? A recent case addressed these issues, and the court’s findings might surprise you. Continue Reading If Your Association Fails to Hold Board Elections at an Annual Meeting, Do You Still Have a Board? The Answer May Surprise You…

An AS IS exculpatory clause in a contract does not automatically relieve a party of any liability, especially where that party committed fraud to obtain the exculpatory clause.

The Facts

In both of the cases referenced below, the defendant included an as-is clause in a real estate contract. In Frianco the bank defendant (after discovering that the property that it had foreclosed on had significant water damage, and after paying to have those damages repaired) advised the purchaser of property in the offer contract that “it had little or no direct knowledge as to the condition of the property.” Similarly in Herhold, the defendant first represented to the buyers that they would be able to build a home on property they were selling, despite knowing of significant issues that would make that difficult or impossible. The defendant then included an “AS IS” clause in the real estate purchase agreement that also stated that “neither Seller, Broker nor Agent have made any representation or warranties…” Continue Reading AS-IS Clause Does Not Foreclose a Fraud Claim

What types of committees does your HOA or condo association need? How should you go about establishing committees?  Listen to this Vlog and in less than a minute you will have the answer.

Want to learn more about Wisconsin condominium and HOA law from experienced condo and HOA attorneys? Read all about condo and HOA law at Association Alert and click here to learn more about lawyer Daniel J. Miske.

Disgruntled unit owners love to review their association documents and then demand every document that they think they might be entitled to.  In this case, the court made clear that reasonableness and discretion will play some part in what must be provided.

The Facts

In December of 2014 the Plaintiff sought to inspect the Associations records, including the:

  1. December 2012 and 2013-2014 bank statements;
  2. General ledger from 2013-2014;
  3. Specific 2013 and 2014 invoices;
  4. Official communications between the Association board members and the New Mexico Office of the State Engineer (OSE);
  5. 2012 and 2014 end of fiscal year and year-end balance sheets;
  6. 2012 and 2014 profit and loss reports;
  7. December 2014 accounts receivable aging report; and
  8. December 2014 open invoices report.

The Association was incorporated in 1973 in New Mexico. Plaintiff wanted to inspect the records because she was concerned over the increase in unpaid dues owed the Association and the Board’s financial reporting.

The Board produced most of the records, but “did not produce for inspection the bank statements, the general ledger, invoices, the accounts receivable aging reports, an open invoice report, and communications between board members and the OSE.” Continue Reading Inspection Rights of Unit Owners are NOT Endless

Please join Husch Blackwell’s Condominium and HOA Law Team and MPC Property Management at the Fireside Restaurant & Lounge on October 24 as we discuss the topics of collections, Husch Blackwell’s new Legal Document Review Program and other legal issues facing your associations.

Topics

  • Bringing your association back to black: collecting those delinquent assessments
  • Husch Blackwell LLP Legal Document Review Program
  • Your questions! We will leave plenty of time for legal Q&A

Continue Reading Association Academy: Collections – October 24, 2019

Summary

The United States District Court held that a prior recorded condominium lien had priority over a federal tax lien but only to the extent of the amount stated in the lien notice. SO make sure you get everything you should in your lien filing.

I want to thank attorney William Z. Kolobaric and Hirzel Law, PLC in Michigan for bringing this case to my attention and for allowing me to reprint large portions of their blog on this subject.

The Facts

Defendant Pamela Norwood (“Norwood”) bought a condominium unit in March 2015 in the Yarmouth Commons Condominium project (“Condominium Unit”).  On April 6, 2015, the IRS made an assessment of past due income taxes against Norwood for the 2009 tax year she failed to pay but it was not until February 8, 2016 that the IRS recorded a Notice of Federal Tax Lien with the Macomb County Register of Deeds against Norwood’s property in Macomb County, which included the Condominium Unit.  About 10 days earlier, on January 28, 2016, Yarmouth Commons Association (“Association”) recorded a notice of lien with the Macomb County Register of Deeds in the amount of $1,490.00 for unpaid assessments, exclusive of interest, costs, attorney fees and any future assessments which may become due. Continue Reading Your Condo Lien can be Prior to a Federal Tax Lien if you File it Correctly, Timely & for the Full Amount Due

Does your condominium association or HOA sign contracts for vendor services? Who does the contract protect – the vendor or the association?  What you need to know about condo association and HOA vendor contracts in less than a minute.

Want to learn more about Wisconsin condominium and HOA law from experienced condo and HOA attorneys? Read all about condo and HOA law at Association Alert and click here to learn more about lawyer Daniel J. Miske.

Summary

The US Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit held that a subrogation waiver provision in a construction contract barred an association’s insurance company from seeking to recover from an allegedly negligent contractor.

Facts

United National Insurance Company v. Peninsula Roofing Company, Inc.:  Pelican Beach Condominium (“Association”) needed a new roof. The Board, after obtaining specifications from an engineer, entered into a contract with Peninsula Roofing (“Contractor”).  The contract was a standard form AIA contract that is widely used throughout the country.  Peninsula Roofing placed a generator in the Association’s parking garage from which the contractor ran extension lines to power its tools. The generator caught fire and caused about $3 million dollars in property damage. Continue Reading Association Construction Contracts – What are Risks of that Waiver of Subrogation Term